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Roman Iron Age pottery (‘local traditional ware’) is found in small quantities on Roman military sites. They are almost all jars rather than bowls, and usually have an everted rim. Some are sooted and have been used over an open fire.

 

 

1. South Shields, barrack IX (c.210-222), 3598.
2. Wallsend, over barrack 9 (unstratified), G13:03. Sooting on interior of rim.
3. Fabric group 2. South Shields, vicus well fill (late third century), 16115. Thin-section sample group 2B (a). Sooting on exterior.
4. Fabric group 1. South Shields, courtyard house (c.325), 20313. Thin-section sample group 1(d). Heavily sooted under rim and on upper part of the body, but with little on the lower half of the body.
5. Fabric group 1. Newcastle, early Anglo-Saxon features, 86AU.
6. Fabric group 1. South Shields, layer below building C2 (late second century), SS66 FU. Thin-section sample group 1 (a). Patches of soot on exterior.
7. South Shields, courtyard house (ploughsoil), 9603. Patches of soot on exterior.
8. Wallsend, cistern fill (c.270), E08:27. Patch of burnt organic remains on exterior.
9. Fabric group 2. Newcastle, early Anglo-Saxon features, 85IS. Roughly burnished on exterior.
10. South Shields, courtyard house (ploughsoil), 9601. Sooting on interior surface.
11. Fabric group 2. Newcastle, early Anglo-Saxon features, 86AQ.
12. Fabric group 6. South Shields, barrack (c.325- c.375), 5107. Thin-section sample group 2A (a).
13. South Shields, barracks III-V (c.222 - late third century), 4873.

 

IMAGES

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Cat. no. 8, showing burning on rim Cat. no. 2, fabric

Cat. no. 2, showing burning on rim Cat. no. 9, showing burnishing

Cat. no. 9, fabric Cat. no. 9. The large mica plates (appearing white here) make this fabric extremely glittery

 

 

 

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